Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are common intestinal pathogens of humans and animals. Dogs may be infected by zoonotic isolates of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. that, consequently, have high interest under public health perspective. This study estimated the occurrence of these protozoa in canine faeces polluting public areas of Padua municipality (Northern Italy), towards a potential evaluation of health risks for dogs and humans. A total of 705 canine stools was collected in green (n = 270) and urban (n = 435) areas and processed by duplex real-time PCR and real-time PCR SYBR® Green I for the detection of both protozoa. Positive samples were submitted to specific nested PCRs (i.e. β-giardin/SSU-rRNA genes for Giardia; SSU-rRNA gene for Cryptosporidium) to obtain detailed information on the isolates retrieved.Giardia and Cryptosporidium prevalence were 28.9% and 1.7%, respectively. Twenty-one Giardia-positive samples were successfully identified as dog-specific assemblages C and D, and 1 as the human-specific assemblage B. One isolate was identified as Cryptosporidium canis, while the other 11 were confirmed to belong to the Cryptosporidium parvum species complex. Contrariwise to the Cryptosporidium low prevalence, the wide distribution of Giardia suggests a high risk of infection for dogs attending public areas. Although data indicate a limited risk for human health, it is necessary to improve general education to reduce canine faecal pollution towards a widespread awareness of health risks.

Molecular detection of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in canine faecal samples contaminating public areas in Northern Italy

Traversa, Donato;Di Cesare, Angela;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are common intestinal pathogens of humans and animals. Dogs may be infected by zoonotic isolates of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. that, consequently, have high interest under public health perspective. This study estimated the occurrence of these protozoa in canine faeces polluting public areas of Padua municipality (Northern Italy), towards a potential evaluation of health risks for dogs and humans. A total of 705 canine stools was collected in green (n = 270) and urban (n = 435) areas and processed by duplex real-time PCR and real-time PCR SYBR® Green I for the detection of both protozoa. Positive samples were submitted to specific nested PCRs (i.e. β-giardin/SSU-rRNA genes for Giardia; SSU-rRNA gene for Cryptosporidium) to obtain detailed information on the isolates retrieved.Giardia and Cryptosporidium prevalence were 28.9% and 1.7%, respectively. Twenty-one Giardia-positive samples were successfully identified as dog-specific assemblages C and D, and 1 as the human-specific assemblage B. One isolate was identified as Cryptosporidium canis, while the other 11 were confirmed to belong to the Cryptosporidium parvum species complex. Contrariwise to the Cryptosporidium low prevalence, the wide distribution of Giardia suggests a high risk of infection for dogs attending public areas. Although data indicate a limited risk for human health, it is necessary to improve general education to reduce canine faecal pollution towards a widespread awareness of health risks.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11575/99610
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