The mucolytic agent S-carboxymethylcysteine is widely used as an expectorant for the treatment of numerous respiratory disorders. The metabolic fate of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine is complex. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that the metabolism of this agent differs within the same individual, with sulfur oxygenated metabolites generated upon night-time administration. It has been indicated that this drug behaves like a free radical scavenger and that, in this regard, the sulfide is the active species with sulphoxide metabolites (already oxidized) being inactive. Consequently, a night-time consumption of the drug should be more effective upon daytime administration. Still, this diurnal variation in biotransformation (deactivation) is dependent on the genetic polymorphism on which relies the patient population capacities of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine sulphoxidation. It has been reported that those cohorts who are efficient sulfur oxidizers will generate inactive oxygenated metabolites. In contrast, those who have a relative deficiency in this mechanism will be subjected to the active sulfide for a more extended period. In this regard, it is noteworthy that 38–39% of Parkinson’s disease patients belong to the poor sulphoxide cohort, being exposed to higher levels of active sulfide, the active antioxidant metabolite of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine. Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects predominately dopaminergic neurons. It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Based on this evidence, in this study, we evaluated the effects of S-carboxymethyl cysteine in an in vitro model of Parkinson’s disease in protecting against oxidative stress injury. The data obtained suggested that an S-carboxymethylcysteine-enriched diet could be beneficial during aging to protect neurons from oxidative imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction, thus preventing the progression of neurodegenerative processes.

S-Carboxymethyl Cysteine Protects against Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Impairment in a Parkinson’s Disease In Vitro Model

Catanesi, Mariano;Benedetti, Elisabetta;Alfonsetti, Margherita;Quintiliani, Massimiliano;Cimini, Annamaria;
2021

Abstract

The mucolytic agent S-carboxymethylcysteine is widely used as an expectorant for the treatment of numerous respiratory disorders. The metabolic fate of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine is complex. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that the metabolism of this agent differs within the same individual, with sulfur oxygenated metabolites generated upon night-time administration. It has been indicated that this drug behaves like a free radical scavenger and that, in this regard, the sulfide is the active species with sulphoxide metabolites (already oxidized) being inactive. Consequently, a night-time consumption of the drug should be more effective upon daytime administration. Still, this diurnal variation in biotransformation (deactivation) is dependent on the genetic polymorphism on which relies the patient population capacities of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine sulphoxidation. It has been reported that those cohorts who are efficient sulfur oxidizers will generate inactive oxygenated metabolites. In contrast, those who have a relative deficiency in this mechanism will be subjected to the active sulfide for a more extended period. In this regard, it is noteworthy that 38–39% of Parkinson’s disease patients belong to the poor sulphoxide cohort, being exposed to higher levels of active sulfide, the active antioxidant metabolite of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine. Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects predominately dopaminergic neurons. It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Based on this evidence, in this study, we evaluated the effects of S-carboxymethyl cysteine in an in vitro model of Parkinson’s disease in protecting against oxidative stress injury. The data obtained suggested that an S-carboxymethylcysteine-enriched diet could be beneficial during aging to protect neurons from oxidative imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction, thus preventing the progression of neurodegenerative processes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11575/115778
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