The aim of the study was to investigate the breed predisposition and the diagnostic and surgical management of horses referred for cryptorchidism. The breed, localization of retained testis, diagnosis, type of surgical treatment and complications were analyzed. Seventy horses were included in the study; the Western Riding horse breeds were the most affected (Quarter Horse 34/70, 48.5%; Appaloosa 9/70, 12.8%). In unilateral cryptorchids (65/70, 92.8%) the most common location for a retained testis was the left abdomen (28/65, 43%), while in bilateral cryptorchids (5/70, 7.1%), bilateral abdominal retention was the most frequent (3/5, 6%). Information about testis localization was achieved through transabdominal ultrasound (30/49 cases, 61.2%), through per rectum palpation (21/49 cases, 42.9%) and through inguinal palpation (14/49 cases, 28.9%). Cryptorchidectomy was achieved with standing laparoscopy (44/70 cases, 62.8%), or with open inguinal orchiectomy in general anesthesia (26/70 cases, 37.2%). Complications during laparoscopy were spleen puncture (1/44, 2.2%), a self-limiting bleeding from the spermatic cord (10/44 cases, 22.7%), hyperthermia (3/44 cases, 6.8%), and emphysema (15/44, 34%). During inguinal open cryptorchidectomy difficulties with identifying the inguinal testis during surgery (8/26 cases, 30.8%) and a moderate and self-limiting swelling of the inguinal region after surgery (17/26, 65.4%) were observed. For orchiectomy, a standing laparoscopy was confirmed as the preferred procedure for an abdominally retained testis with almost no complications.

A retrospective study of cryptorchidectomy in horses: Diagnosis, treatment, outcome and complications in 70 cases

Stratico P.;Varasano V.;Guerri G.
;
Celani G.;Palozzo A.;Petrizzi L.
2020-01-01

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the breed predisposition and the diagnostic and surgical management of horses referred for cryptorchidism. The breed, localization of retained testis, diagnosis, type of surgical treatment and complications were analyzed. Seventy horses were included in the study; the Western Riding horse breeds were the most affected (Quarter Horse 34/70, 48.5%; Appaloosa 9/70, 12.8%). In unilateral cryptorchids (65/70, 92.8%) the most common location for a retained testis was the left abdomen (28/65, 43%), while in bilateral cryptorchids (5/70, 7.1%), bilateral abdominal retention was the most frequent (3/5, 6%). Information about testis localization was achieved through transabdominal ultrasound (30/49 cases, 61.2%), through per rectum palpation (21/49 cases, 42.9%) and through inguinal palpation (14/49 cases, 28.9%). Cryptorchidectomy was achieved with standing laparoscopy (44/70 cases, 62.8%), or with open inguinal orchiectomy in general anesthesia (26/70 cases, 37.2%). Complications during laparoscopy were spleen puncture (1/44, 2.2%), a self-limiting bleeding from the spermatic cord (10/44 cases, 22.7%), hyperthermia (3/44 cases, 6.8%), and emphysema (15/44, 34%). During inguinal open cryptorchidectomy difficulties with identifying the inguinal testis during surgery (8/26 cases, 30.8%) and a moderate and self-limiting swelling of the inguinal region after surgery (17/26, 65.4%) were observed. For orchiectomy, a standing laparoscopy was confirmed as the preferred procedure for an abdominally retained testis with almost no complications.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11575/111910
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